How Many MPs Must Get Dissed? Five of the Biggest Punchlines in British Politics

Cover Image

Some of the shit which MPs come out with is downright despicable. False promises are one thing, but is there any justification for the use of violent language in politics?

In recent years, we’ve seen toxic rhetoric being hurled about left, right and centre, much of which has been directed at Prime Minister Theresa May or “Maybot” as her critics like to label her.

Some opponents have called for her to be “knifed in the front”, whilst others have suggested that she should “bring her noose” to a gathering of backbenchers.

Since the Brexit referendum, there’s been a considerable rise in the use of violent rhetoric. Few events in recent history have proved more divisive, and, as politicians have come to blows, so too has public discourse taken a turn for the worst.

This normalising of violence in public debate has raised important questions of those in positions of power. Holders of public office, it’s been argued, have an unequivocal duty to speak respectfully and responsibly. So, why is that politicians get away with saying the things they do?

I recently watched a fascinating interview with Drill MC, Drillminister, in which the rapper calls out politicians for being hypocritical in their use of derogatory language. In a Good Morning Britain group debate with Labour MP, Dawn Butler and Spiked Deputy Editor, Tom Slater, it’s pointed out that many of the negative metaphors found in British politics draw curious similarities with those rap music.

This got me thinking: is there a hypocrisy at work in society with regards to freedom of speech? Are politicians pardoned for the very same words which rappers are called out on and condemned for?

I love a good punchline as much as the next person, but are politicians really just emcees in disguise? These punchlines seem to suggest so:

George Osborne’s Freezer remark

George Osborne

George’s Osborne’s remark about not resting until Theresa May is “chopped up in bags my freezer” is the stuff of nightmares and says a lot about his commitment to the Conservative Party. Big L dropped a similar bar back in ’95 which went: “It ain’t no food my fridge just body parts”. On another occasion, the former Chancellor called May a “dead woman walking”.

Jess Phillips draws for the shank

Jess Phillips

Labour MP, Jess Phillips got straight “medieval” on Jeremy Corbyn’s arse when she said: “The day that it becomes you are hurting us more than helping us, I won’t knife you in the back – I’ll knife you in the front.” A similar declaration of “shanking” can be found in the Brotha Lynch Hung song, Stabbed, where the rapper says: “Giving me somethin’ to stab at, yeah that/ I’ma be huntin’ they ass back (Brrat-brrat!)”

Subtle Nuttall

Paul Nuttall

Former UKIP leader, Paul Nuttall, didn’t exactly mince his words when he suggested that SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon should be thrown in front of a horse. The infamous Notorious B.I.G., as many may recall, dropped this similar bar back in the ‘90s: “Big Poppa, throwing niggas off of cliffs, smoking spliffs/ Disappear with my bitch in a Mitsubishi Eclipse.”

A serious hog roasting

Tony Banks

The late Tony Banks once launched a searing attack on Conservative MP Terry Dicks, who he described as “living proof that a pig’s bladder on the end of a stick can be elected to Parliament.” In hip hop, a pig, more often than not, refers to a police officer, as rapper, Your Old Droog, shows us in his hog roast, G.K.A.C.: “Gotta kill a cop, gotta kill a cop pop/ Imma put that pig in a blanket”.

Thatcher the killer

Ken Livingstone

Former Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone is on record as saying: “I’ve met serial killers and assassins but nobody scared me as much as Margaret thatcher”. His portrayal of Thatcher wouldn’t look out of place in the Boogie Down Productions song, 7 Dee Jays, where the former Prime Minister is described as a “man without a manicure” in need of a bashing.

Are there any other examples we’ve missed? Comment below and let us know!

No Comments

Post a Comment