ICONS – An Exhibition Celebrating ’90s Revolutionaries

ICONS

This month, Highlight Nation proudly launched ICONS – a month long exhbition that highlights creatives and innovators of the ’90s that have helped shape the world that we live in today.

We returned to Matthews Yard in Croydon, South London, where we hosted our first exhibition, 2Pac, Changes, which was met with massive positivity. This gave us the stepping stone to host our latest event, Don’t Look Back In Anger at London Bridge, which celebrated British art and culture in the 90s. This time, we seek to showcase innovators across the globe from the end of the last century.

Rishi specialises in detailed portraits that capture the emotional energy that each of his subjects represent.

Rishi specialises in detailed portraits that capture the emotional energy that each of his subjects represent.

At the climax of the last century, creativity had reached its ultimate peak and saw an era revolutionary powerhouses that massively changed the way society is today due to their mastery.

Tyneside artist, Paul Reeve, highlights the essence of each figure involved in all of his pieces. Oasis were one of the last great Rock ‘n’ Roll bands that the UK boasted in the last century

Tyneside artist, Paul Reeve, highlights the essence of each figure involved in all of his pieces. Oasis were one of the last great Rock ‘n’ Roll bands that the UK boasted in the last century.

Pop culture became British, sports personalities became diverse, musicians became symbols and the oppressed became world leaders.

Melisa Moreu’s art (left) tells a story of women caught up in conflict in Colombia through the parallelism of the symbol of Prince and the symbol of a demobilised community leader. Both are icons beyond their name. Rishi Bakrania’s painting (right) captures one of Michael Jordan’s most iconic dunks.

Melisa Moreu’s art (left) tells a story of women caught up in conflict in Colombia through the parallelism of the symbol of Prince and the symbol of a demobilised community leader. Both are icons beyond their name.
Rishi Bakrania’s painting (right) captures one of Michael Jordan’s most iconic dunks.

We might not see such a vibrant time like this again but these icons will never be forgotten as our collective keps their legacy shining in the most enduring way possible with their inspired vision and skill.

Based in Croydon, South London, Vikram has seen success across different forms of media from film to illustration. Rest In Peace Uncle Phil!

Based in Croydon, South London, Vikram has seen success across different forms of media from film to illustration. Rest In Peace Uncle Phil!

The gallery at Matthews Yard is open everyday this month but also join us on the evening of Saturday, 29th September for the finale party, where the artists and other local talent will have a toast to the ’90s.

Cain The Abyss is an up-and-coming artist from London with a psychedelic approach to storytelling. His hand-drawn painting of Scary Spice recognises how unapologetically black she was in a band dominated by white girls.

Cain The Abyss is an up-and-coming artist from London with a psychedelic approach to storytelling. His hand-drawn painting of Scary Spice recognises how unapologetically black she was in a band dominated by white girls.

Contributing Artists:

Rishi Bakrania

Renée Antoinette

Melisa Moreu

Paul Reeve

Ellie Reader

Vikram Rekhi

Sams Crayon

Sumit Rehal

Cainnabis

Jaspal Kaur

The Royal Jesters

Entry is free, for tickets – click here.

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